Auckland Architecture Week, 23-28 September 2014

Welcome to Auckland Architecture Week, brought to you by the Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects.

The greatest misconception about architecture is that its sole concern is buildings. The reality is that architecture is about people, and the concerns of architects tend to reflect those of the populace. 

Auckland Architecture Week 2014 will address many of the concerns facing Auckland, but the sequence of (mostly free) events is also programmed for fun. Architecture Week is a chance to celebrate the city’s successes and the creativity of those that live here and further afield. It’s a chance to engage with some of New Zealand’s best architectural practitioners and thinkers. You could join a conversation about the Auckland Design Manual, listen to a top Mexican architect, discover the art of the architect or hear some of our top designers discuss ways to approach a bungalow renovation. All this and more at Auckland Architecture Week 2014. 

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Download the programme here.

Auckland Architecture Week 2014 is presented by the New Zealand Institute of Architects - Auckland Branch.

Many thanks to AUT University, this year’s principal sponsor.

And thanks to all our supporters: Inhouse Design, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, Sto, drikolor, St Paul Street Gallery, Auckland Council, Metro Glass, The Warren Trust, The University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning, and the Block Foundation.

Gentle Foundations: Extrapolations of The Whare in the BushSt Paul Street Gallery ThreeOPENING TUESDAY 23|Time: 5.30pmTues 23 — Sun 28 SeptCost: Free
Gentle Foundations responds to aspects of collective memory, architecture school dreams and a love of tiny houses. Through Gentle Foundations, Rebecca Green and Elisapeta Heta extend their experiences of ‘The Whare in the Bush’ project as a continuing conversation about how a unique group of women practice and design by choosing to privilege process over predetermined outcomes. Integral to the development of this show, is the notion of architecture as narrative, with the potential to ebb and flow with every site and embrace naivety and feminine optimism. In creating Gentle Foundations, the artists have evoked space as a vessel that not only creates memory, but also arrives embedded with its own memory. Curated by Tosh Ahkit in association with Architecture + Women NZ. 
Supported by Kahurangi Estate Wines Gentle Foundations: Extrapolations of The Whare in the BushSt Paul Street Gallery ThreeOPENING TUESDAY 23|Time: 5.30pmTues 23 — Sun 28 SeptCost: Free
Gentle Foundations responds to aspects of collective memory, architecture school dreams and a love of tiny houses. Through Gentle Foundations, Rebecca Green and Elisapeta Heta extend their experiences of ‘The Whare in the Bush’ project as a continuing conversation about how a unique group of women practice and design by choosing to privilege process over predetermined outcomes. Integral to the development of this show, is the notion of architecture as narrative, with the potential to ebb and flow with every site and embrace naivety and feminine optimism. In creating Gentle Foundations, the artists have evoked space as a vessel that not only creates memory, but also arrives embedded with its own memory. Curated by Tosh Ahkit in association with Architecture + Women NZ. 
Supported by Kahurangi Estate Wines

Gentle Foundations: Extrapolations of The Whare in the Bush
St Paul Street Gallery Three
OPENING TUESDAY 23|
Time: 5.30pm
Tues 23 — Sun 28 Sept
Cost: Free

Gentle Foundations responds to aspects of collective memory, architecture school dreams and a love of tiny houses. Through Gentle Foundations, Rebecca Green and Elisapeta Heta extend their experiences of ‘The Whare in the Bush’ project as a continuing conversation about how a unique group of women practice and design by choosing to privilege process over predetermined outcomes. Integral to the development of this show, is the notion of architecture as narrative, with the potential to ebb and flow with every site and embrace naivety and feminine optimism. In creating Gentle Foundations, the artists have evoked space as a vessel that not only creates memory, but also arrives embedded with its own memory. Curated by Tosh Ahkit in association with Architecture + Women NZ

Supported by Kahurangi Estate Wines

The Cubic Structural Evolution ProjectON UNTIL 1 MARCH 2015Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North AtriumCost: Free
The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is a hands-on installation by Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson. On loan from the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, it comprises thousands of pieces of white Lego bricks scattered on a 12-metre-long table. Visitors to Auckland Art Gallery will become ‘architects’ by using Lego to create and re-form structures. See cityscapes emerge and constantly evolve as new visitors contribute to the work through construction, modification, destruction and re-construction – the processes inherent to the lifecycle of any metropolis. The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is supported by the New Zealand Institute of Architects, the Designers Institute of New Zealand, Gib and Corian. It is a great way for younger (and older) generations to get interested in the possibilities of architecture. The Cubic Structural Evolution ProjectON UNTIL 1 MARCH 2015Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North AtriumCost: Free
The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is a hands-on installation by Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson. On loan from the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, it comprises thousands of pieces of white Lego bricks scattered on a 12-metre-long table. Visitors to Auckland Art Gallery will become ‘architects’ by using Lego to create and re-form structures. See cityscapes emerge and constantly evolve as new visitors contribute to the work through construction, modification, destruction and re-construction – the processes inherent to the lifecycle of any metropolis. The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is supported by the New Zealand Institute of Architects, the Designers Institute of New Zealand, Gib and Corian. It is a great way for younger (and older) generations to get interested in the possibilities of architecture. The Cubic Structural Evolution ProjectON UNTIL 1 MARCH 2015Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North AtriumCost: Free
The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is a hands-on installation by Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson. On loan from the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, it comprises thousands of pieces of white Lego bricks scattered on a 12-metre-long table. Visitors to Auckland Art Gallery will become ‘architects’ by using Lego to create and re-form structures. See cityscapes emerge and constantly evolve as new visitors contribute to the work through construction, modification, destruction and re-construction – the processes inherent to the lifecycle of any metropolis. The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is supported by the New Zealand Institute of Architects, the Designers Institute of New Zealand, Gib and Corian. It is a great way for younger (and older) generations to get interested in the possibilities of architecture.

The Cubic Structural Evolution Project
ON UNTIL 1 MARCH 2015
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North Atrium
Cost: Free

The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is a hands-on installation by Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson. On loan from the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, it comprises thousands of pieces of white Lego bricks scattered on a 12-metre-long table. Visitors to Auckland Art Gallery will become ‘architects’ by using Lego to create and re-form structures. See cityscapes emerge and constantly evolve as new visitors contribute to the work through construction, modification, destruction and re-construction – the processes inherent to the lifecycle of any metropolis. The Cubic Structural Evolution Project is supported by the New Zealand Institute of Architects, the Designers Institute of New Zealand, Gib and Corian. It is a great way for younger (and older) generations to get interested in the possibilities of architecture.

Pecha Kucha Night!TUESDAY 23/09Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North Atrium7.00pm doors open for 7.30pm startCost: $10 door charge and cash bar
Pecha Kucha, the rapid-fire dispersal of ideas and information with an Auckland Architecture Week flavour. Presenters include: Uwe Reiger, associate professor, University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Emily Priest and Dajiang Tai, architectural graduates at Cheshire Architects; Rachel Carley, ceramic designer and teaching fellow at the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Mike Hartley, architect and director, Lloyd Hartley Architects; Nathan Swaney, architectural graduate; Ian Douglas-Jones, creative director, Atelier I-N-D-J; Charles Walker, co-director: Colab, AUT; Dominic Glamazina, architect and director, Glamuzina Paterson Architects; Toby Curnow, design director, Inhouse; Davor Popadich, architect and director, Pattersons; Michael O’ Sullivan, architect and director at Bull O’Sullivan Architects.


 
Pecha Kucha Night!TUESDAY 23/09Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North Atrium7.00pm doors open for 7.30pm startCost: $10 door charge and cash bar
Pecha Kucha, the rapid-fire dispersal of ideas and information with an Auckland Architecture Week flavour. Presenters include: Uwe Reiger, associate professor, University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Emily Priest and Dajiang Tai, architectural graduates at Cheshire Architects; Rachel Carley, ceramic designer and teaching fellow at the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Mike Hartley, architect and director, Lloyd Hartley Architects; Nathan Swaney, architectural graduate; Ian Douglas-Jones, creative director, Atelier I-N-D-J; Charles Walker, co-director: Colab, AUT; Dominic Glamazina, architect and director, Glamuzina Paterson Architects; Toby Curnow, design director, Inhouse; Davor Popadich, architect and director, Pattersons; Michael O’ Sullivan, architect and director at Bull O’Sullivan Architects.


 
Pecha Kucha Night!TUESDAY 23/09Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North Atrium7.00pm doors open for 7.30pm startCost: $10 door charge and cash bar
Pecha Kucha, the rapid-fire dispersal of ideas and information with an Auckland Architecture Week flavour. Presenters include: Uwe Reiger, associate professor, University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Emily Priest and Dajiang Tai, architectural graduates at Cheshire Architects; Rachel Carley, ceramic designer and teaching fellow at the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Mike Hartley, architect and director, Lloyd Hartley Architects; Nathan Swaney, architectural graduate; Ian Douglas-Jones, creative director, Atelier I-N-D-J; Charles Walker, co-director: Colab, AUT; Dominic Glamazina, architect and director, Glamuzina Paterson Architects; Toby Curnow, design director, Inhouse; Davor Popadich, architect and director, Pattersons; Michael O’ Sullivan, architect and director at Bull O’Sullivan Architects.


 

Pecha Kucha Night!
TUESDAY 23/09
Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki North Atrium
7.00pm doors open for 7.30pm start
Cost: $10 door charge and cash bar

Pecha Kucha, the rapid-fire dispersal of ideas and information with an Auckland Architecture Week flavour. Presenters include: Uwe Reiger, associate professor, University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Emily Priest and Dajiang Tai, architectural graduates at Cheshire ArchitectsRachel Carley, ceramic designer and teaching fellow at the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning; Mike Hartley, architect and director, Lloyd Hartley Architects; Nathan Swaney, architectural graduate; Ian Douglas-Jones, creative director, Atelier I-N-D-J; Charles Walker, co-director: Colab, AUT; Dominic Glamazina, architect and director, Glamuzina Paterson ArchitectsToby Curnow, design director, InhouseDavor Popadich, architect and director, Pattersons; Michael O’ Sullivan, architect and director at Bull O’Sullivan Architects.

 

Last Loneliest Loveliest in VeniceTHURSDAY 26/9Auckland Art GalleryToi o Tamaki AuditoriumTime: 1.00pmCost: Free
It’s taken a long time for New Zealand to get a national exhibition to the Venice Architecture Biennale, but this year it finally happened. Leading architect David Mitchell and his hand-picked team sallied forth to Venice with Last Loneliest Loveliest, an exhibition (and proposition) about where New Zealand architecture has come from, where it might go, and how the islands in the South Pacific are connected to a wider architectural world. Like other national exhibitions at Venice, New Zealand responded to a provocation by Biennale curator Rem Koolhaas: do modern buildings, regardless of country, all look the same? You can hear David’s thoughts at this lunchtime lecture. See more of the exhibition here. Last Loneliest Loveliest in VeniceTHURSDAY 26/9Auckland Art GalleryToi o Tamaki AuditoriumTime: 1.00pmCost: Free
It’s taken a long time for New Zealand to get a national exhibition to the Venice Architecture Biennale, but this year it finally happened. Leading architect David Mitchell and his hand-picked team sallied forth to Venice with Last Loneliest Loveliest, an exhibition (and proposition) about where New Zealand architecture has come from, where it might go, and how the islands in the South Pacific are connected to a wider architectural world. Like other national exhibitions at Venice, New Zealand responded to a provocation by Biennale curator Rem Koolhaas: do modern buildings, regardless of country, all look the same? You can hear David’s thoughts at this lunchtime lecture. See more of the exhibition here.

Last Loneliest Loveliest in Venice
THURSDAY 26/9
Auckland Art GalleryToi o Tamaki Auditorium
Time: 1.00pm
Cost: Free

It’s taken a long time for New Zealand to get a national exhibition to the Venice Architecture Biennale, but this year it finally happened. Leading architect David Mitchell and his hand-picked team sallied forth to Venice with Last Loneliest Loveliest, an exhibition (and proposition) about where New Zealand architecture has come from, where it might go, and how the islands in the South Pacific are connected to a wider architectural world. Like other national exhibitions at Venice, New Zealand responded to a provocation by Biennale curator Rem Koolhaas: do modern buildings, regardless of country, all look the same? You can hear David’s thoughts at this lunchtime lecture. See more of the exhibition here.

Auckland Conversation: Auckland – A Design-Led CityIn association with the New Zealand Institute of Architects and Jalcon HomesTHURSDAY 25/09Aotea Centre – Lower NZI Conference RoomTime: 5.00 – 7.00pmCost: Free
Resister here
Find out how Auckland is becoming a design-led city through the delivery of a well-connected, world-class centre. The design-led city approach is a collaborative process between public and private sectors. It embeds design thinking into the vision and plans for the region, unlocking creative minds so that the city’s design and its adaptive response to place, context and culture will, in time, be seen as its competitive edge.  At this conversation, learn how the Auckland Design Manual will provide a new platform for a design-led Auckland and hear from Auckland Council design champion Ludo Campbell-Reid, architects Pip and Nat Cheshire, and the Hobsonville Land Company, who are transforming and revitalising Auckland through the design of homes, streetscapes, public spaces and the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings.
Auckland Conversation: Auckland – A Design-Led CityIn association with the New Zealand Institute of Architects and Jalcon HomesTHURSDAY 25/09Aotea Centre – Lower NZI Conference RoomTime: 5.00 – 7.00pmCost: Free
Resister here
Find out how Auckland is becoming a design-led city through the delivery of a well-connected, world-class centre. The design-led city approach is a collaborative process between public and private sectors. It embeds design thinking into the vision and plans for the region, unlocking creative minds so that the city’s design and its adaptive response to place, context and culture will, in time, be seen as its competitive edge.  At this conversation, learn how the Auckland Design Manual will provide a new platform for a design-led Auckland and hear from Auckland Council design champion Ludo Campbell-Reid, architects Pip and Nat Cheshire, and the Hobsonville Land Company, who are transforming and revitalising Auckland through the design of homes, streetscapes, public spaces and the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings.

Auckland Conversation: Auckland – A Design-Led City
In association with the New Zealand Institute of Architects and Jalcon Homes
THURSDAY 25/09
Aotea Centre – Lower NZI Conference Room

Time: 5.00 – 7.00pm
Cost: Free

Resister here

Find out how Auckland is becoming a design-led city through the delivery of a well-connected, world-class centre. The design-led city approach is a collaborative process between public and private sectors. It embeds design thinking into the vision and plans for the region, unlocking creative minds so that the city’s design and its adaptive response to place, context and culture will, in time, be seen as its competitive edge.  At this conversation, learn how the Auckland Design Manual will provide a new platform for a design-led Auckland and hear from Auckland Council design champion Ludo Campbell-Reid, architects Pip and Nat Cheshire, and the Hobsonville Land Company, who are transforming and revitalising Auckland through the design of homes, streetscapes, public spaces and the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings.

Metro Glass presents – Enrique NortenAUT Sir Paul Reeves Large Lecture Theatre W9403FRIDAY 26/09Time: 6.00pmCost: Free
A rare opportunity to hear a Mexican architect speak in New Zealand. Enrique Norten was born in Mexico City in 1954, graduating from the Universidad Iberoamericana with a degree in architecture in 1978. He obtained a Master of Architecture from Cornell University in 1980 and in 1986 founded TEN Arquitectos, initiating a lifelong commitment to architecture and design. Across his career, Enrique has been acknowledged with a “Legacy Award” from the Smithsonian Institution for his contributions to the US arts and culture. In 2005 he received the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts by the World Cultural Council and was the first Mies van der Rohe Award recipient for Latin American Architecture in 1998. His current projects include the Guggenheim Museum in Guadalajara; Xochimilco Master Plan and Aquarium in Mexico City and a plan for the recovery of a 4.5 mile stretch of the New Orleans riverfront. Metro Glass presents – Enrique NortenAUT Sir Paul Reeves Large Lecture Theatre W9403FRIDAY 26/09Time: 6.00pmCost: Free
A rare opportunity to hear a Mexican architect speak in New Zealand. Enrique Norten was born in Mexico City in 1954, graduating from the Universidad Iberoamericana with a degree in architecture in 1978. He obtained a Master of Architecture from Cornell University in 1980 and in 1986 founded TEN Arquitectos, initiating a lifelong commitment to architecture and design. Across his career, Enrique has been acknowledged with a “Legacy Award” from the Smithsonian Institution for his contributions to the US arts and culture. In 2005 he received the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts by the World Cultural Council and was the first Mies van der Rohe Award recipient for Latin American Architecture in 1998. His current projects include the Guggenheim Museum in Guadalajara; Xochimilco Master Plan and Aquarium in Mexico City and a plan for the recovery of a 4.5 mile stretch of the New Orleans riverfront. Metro Glass presents – Enrique NortenAUT Sir Paul Reeves Large Lecture Theatre W9403FRIDAY 26/09Time: 6.00pmCost: Free
A rare opportunity to hear a Mexican architect speak in New Zealand. Enrique Norten was born in Mexico City in 1954, graduating from the Universidad Iberoamericana with a degree in architecture in 1978. He obtained a Master of Architecture from Cornell University in 1980 and in 1986 founded TEN Arquitectos, initiating a lifelong commitment to architecture and design. Across his career, Enrique has been acknowledged with a “Legacy Award” from the Smithsonian Institution for his contributions to the US arts and culture. In 2005 he received the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts by the World Cultural Council and was the first Mies van der Rohe Award recipient for Latin American Architecture in 1998. His current projects include the Guggenheim Museum in Guadalajara; Xochimilco Master Plan and Aquarium in Mexico City and a plan for the recovery of a 4.5 mile stretch of the New Orleans riverfront.

Metro Glass presents – Enrique Norten
AUT Sir Paul Reeves Large Lecture Theatre W9403
FRIDAY 26/09
Time: 6.00pm
Cost: Free

A rare opportunity to hear a Mexican architect speak in New Zealand. Enrique Norten was born in Mexico City in 1954, graduating from the Universidad Iberoamericana with a degree in architecture in 1978. He obtained a Master of Architecture from Cornell University in 1980 and in 1986 founded TEN Arquitectos, initiating a lifelong commitment to architecture and design. Across his career, Enrique has been acknowledged with a “Legacy Award” from the Smithsonian Institution for his contributions to the US arts and culture. In 2005 he received the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts by the World Cultural Council and was the first Mies van der Rohe Award recipient for Latin American Architecture in 1998. His current projects include the Guggenheim Museum in Guadalajara; Xochimilco Master Plan and Aquarium in Mexico City and a plan for the recovery of a 4.5 mile stretch of the New Orleans riverfront.

Auckland Redefined – New Architectural PhotographyFRIDAY 26 — SUNDAY 28 SEPTEMBERAUT Sir Paul Reeves Building FoyerCost: Free
Five of New Zealand’s best architectural photographers seek a new definition for a city on the move. Photographers Patrick Reynolds, Mark Smith, Jackie Meiring, Sam Hartnett and David Straight (who shot the image above) are making visual responses to a question posed by New Zealand Institute of Architects President Pip Cheshire: “Auckland has used the ‘City of Sails’ to promote itself in the past. Isn’t it time we came ashore and defined Auckland by what it is, not what it is next to? What image of Auckland will evoke the spirit of our new city in a way that the billowing sails on the Waitemata once did?” Supported by Urbis and PCL Imaging
Auckland Redefined – New Architectural PhotographyFRIDAY 26 — SUNDAY 28 SEPTEMBERAUT Sir Paul Reeves Building FoyerCost: Free
Five of New Zealand’s best architectural photographers seek a new definition for a city on the move. Photographers Patrick Reynolds, Mark Smith, Jackie Meiring, Sam Hartnett and David Straight (who shot the image above) are making visual responses to a question posed by New Zealand Institute of Architects President Pip Cheshire: “Auckland has used the ‘City of Sails’ to promote itself in the past. Isn’t it time we came ashore and defined Auckland by what it is, not what it is next to? What image of Auckland will evoke the spirit of our new city in a way that the billowing sails on the Waitemata once did?” Supported by Urbis and PCL Imaging

Auckland Redefined – New Architectural Photography
FRIDAY 26 — SUNDAY 28 SEPTEMBER
AUT Sir Paul Reeves Building Foyer
Cost: Free

Five of New Zealand’s best architectural photographers seek a new definition for a city on the move. Photographers Patrick Reynolds, Mark Smith, Jackie Meiring, Sam Hartnett and David Straight (who shot the image above) are making visual responses to a question posed by New Zealand Institute of Architects President Pip Cheshire: “Auckland has used the ‘City of Sails’ to promote itself in the past. Isn’t it time we came ashore and defined Auckland by what it is, not what it is next to? What image of Auckland will evoke the spirit of our new city in a way that the billowing sails on the Waitemata once did?” Supported by Urbis and PCL Imaging

Urbis magazine exhibition launchAUT Sir Paul Reeves Building foyerTime: 7.00 — 9.00pmInvite and RSVP only
The must-attend event on Auckland Architecture Week’s social circuit – grab a drink, meet, mingle and celebrate the opening of Auckland Redefined – New Architectural Photography and enjoy a number of the other great exhibitions also on display at the Sir Paul Reeves Building. Supported by Sto
Urbis magazine exhibition launchAUT Sir Paul Reeves Building foyerTime: 7.00 — 9.00pmInvite and RSVP only
The must-attend event on Auckland Architecture Week’s social circuit – grab a drink, meet, mingle and celebrate the opening of Auckland Redefined – New Architectural Photography and enjoy a number of the other great exhibitions also on display at the Sir Paul Reeves Building. Supported by Sto

Urbis magazine exhibition launch
AUT Sir Paul Reeves Building foyer
Time: 7.00 — 9.00pm
Invite and RSVP only

The must-attend event on Auckland Architecture Week’s social circuit – grab a drink, meet, mingle and celebrate the opening of Auckland Redefined – New Architectural Photography and enjoy a number of the other great exhibitions also on display at the Sir Paul Reeves Building. Supported by Sto

Christchurch 2061 – Studio ChristchurchFRIDAY 26/9AUT Sir Paul Reeves Building FoyerFri 26 — Sun 28 Sept
Cost: FreeWho’s thinking about the future? Studio Christchurch is. If there are any positive outcomes from a significant natural disaster it might be that it provides impetus for sharp design minds to focus on the future of seismic construction. The Seismic Design Studio – a close collaboration between architects and engineers – is an exploration of performance-based design and extrapolated current technology toward experimental architectural visions for Christchurch 2061. The exhibition summarises current technology applied in Christchurch and presents a series of speculative design proposals in render and shake-table model form.
Christchurch 2061 – Studio ChristchurchFRIDAY 26/9AUT Sir Paul Reeves Building FoyerFri 26 — Sun 28 Sept
Cost: FreeWho’s thinking about the future? Studio Christchurch is. If there are any positive outcomes from a significant natural disaster it might be that it provides impetus for sharp design minds to focus on the future of seismic construction. The Seismic Design Studio – a close collaboration between architects and engineers – is an exploration of performance-based design and extrapolated current technology toward experimental architectural visions for Christchurch 2061. The exhibition summarises current technology applied in Christchurch and presents a series of speculative design proposals in render and shake-table model form.

Christchurch 2061 – Studio Christchurch
FRIDAY 26/9
AUT Sir Paul Reeves Building Foyer
Fri 26 — Sun 28 Sept

Cost: FreeWho’s thinking about the future? Studio Christchurch is. If there are any positive outcomes from a significant natural disaster it might be that it provides impetus for sharp design minds to focus on the future of seismic construction. The Seismic Design Studio – a close collaboration between architects and engineers – is an exploration of performance-based design and extrapolated current technology toward experimental architectural visions for Christchurch 2061. The exhibition summarises current technology applied in Christchurch and presents a series of speculative design proposals in render and shake-table model form.